The truth, the whole truth and nothing BUTT!?

Posted and compiled by:
Michelle Edmonds, M.A., M.Ed.
Sr. Nutritionist|Author||Co-Founder
Serenity Weight Loss and Detoxification Program
Founded in 1992 

This is the Problem:

Boston University BU, School of Public Health SPH, Julie Palmer research, African American black women obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Slone Epidemiology Center, Black Women’s Health Study BWHS, burgers red meat versus mexican food pizza

1.Obesity and African Americans

  • African American women have the highest rates of being overweight or obese compared to other groups in the U.S. About four out of five African American women are overweight or obese.
  • In 2011, African Americans were 1.5 times as likely to be obese as Non- Hispanic Whites.
  • In 2011, African American women were 80% more likely to be obese than Non-Hispanic White women.
  • In 2007-2010, African American girls were 80% more likely to be overweight than Non-Hispanic White girls.
Source: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/templates/content.aspx?ID=6456

2.Obesity affects some groups more than others

  • Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest age-adjusted rates of obesity (47.8%) followed by Hispanics (42.5%), non-Hispanic whites (32.6%), and non-Hispanic Asians (10.8%)
Source: http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html

3. African American Women and The Obesity Epidemic


DEC 19, 2011
It's not news that Americans are dealing with an obesity epidemic. But the problem is particularly acute among African-American women.
Four in five African-American women are obese or overweight, according to the U.S. Office of Minority Health, and carrying those excess pounds can spike the risk for several conditions including heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and stroke. 

Members of the Anderson Monarchs soccer team practice as their coach looks on. The team, which was started at Philadelphia's Marian Anderson Recreation Center, gives game time to girls who have little chance to play another sport (Photo by Todd Vachon/WHYY).
About half of African-American women in the U.S. are obese, compared to 30 percent of white women. Black women not only carry more weight, but they start adding extra pounds years before their white counterparts.
  http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/stories/2011/december/19/african-american-obesity.aspx

This is who we are listening to about the problem:


1. Dr. Oz Defends His 'Miracles

Sen. McCaskill grills the popular TV personality on his dubious nutrition claims.








2. Exploring the Causes of Black Women’s Obesity

Fighting Fat: Solutions include education, urban beautification, crime control


Julie Palmer, Black Women's Health Study (BWHS), Slone Epidemiology Center, Obesity in Black African American Women
Julie Palmer, a senior epidemiologist at BU's Slone Epidemiology Center, has coordinated the Black Women's Health Study since 1995. Photo by Kathleen Dooher

In part four of a four-part serieson the nation’s obesity epidemic,BU Today spotlights the innovative research taking place at BU to better understand and solve this health problem.

No population in the United States has a higher obesity rate than African American women, four out of five of whom are overweight or obese, according to a 2012 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In the general adult population, 70 percent of adults are overweight or obese.
Julie Palmer (SPH’85) is trying to do something about the problem. Palmer, a senior epidemiologist atBU’s Slone Epidemiology Centerand a School of Public Health professor of epidemiology, is a coordinator of the Black Women’s Health Study (BWHS), which has been tracking the health of 59,000 African American women since 1995. Along with looking for the reasons why diabetes, breast cancer, and glaucoma plague black women, her team has explored the root causes of their obesity and suggested realistic ways they can alter their lifestyles to lose weight.

Boston University BU, School of Public Health SPH, Julie Palmer research, African American black women obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Slone Epidemiology Center, Black Womens Health Study BWHS, sugary soft drinks soda calories
The Black Women’s Health Study found that women who consumed large amounts of  soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages were more likely to be overweight or obese. Photo courtesy of Wikipedia Commons user Marlith
Psychological and social factors also have an impact. “Women who report more experiences of racism have been shown to be more likely to become obese,” Palmer says. About 55 percent of study participants reported experiencing discrimination at work, according to a July 2012 BWHS newsletter. Palmer also found that participants who live in disadvantaged neighborhoods—where grocery stores are scarce, parks and sidewalks aren’t maintained, or crime is rampant—often gained weight or were obese.

Bloggers Note: Racism makes you angry. Back to Serenity's "Weight of Anger" series, February 2014 However, it is not just racism,  it is also sexism. Sexism includes  molestation, rape, sexual assaults, husbands doing their thing,  while the wives  carry the burden,  unfair hiring and promotional practices and standards of beauty that still favor the European standard. 

Tip: Stop the harassing remarks about hair. Most women, regardless of race, who can afford to,  use sew-ins to create fuller hair.
Boston University BU, School of Public Health SPH, Julie Palmer research, African American black women obesity, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Slone Epidemiology Center, Black Women’s Health Study BWHS, walking regular exercise weight loss obesity prevention
Palmer’s team found that women who did brisk walking or walked as a means of transportation had a lower risk of becoming obese.
Source and for full article, click here: http://www.bu.edu/today/2012/exploring-the-causes-of-black-womens-obesity/

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